History


 

 

Headwest was established in February 1980 as the “Head Injured Society of WA” by a core group of four families who each had a son with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). At the time there was no information or assistance for people with brain injuries that had finished therapy at the Royal Perth Hospital Rehabilitation centre. 

 

In the 1980's the aim of the Head Injured Society of WA was the same as it is today - to assist and support those with an ABI and their families, improve services during the post discharge period, and increase community awareness about the issues faced by those with an ABI and their families.

 

During the period up to 1989, the society grew in size and financial independence. The Alfred Cove property was purchased and two buses were used to pick up members and go on regular social outings. In the early years, all the staff were volunteers and a number of fundraising activities were carried out. As the society became busier one full-time and several part-time paid staff were employed. 

 

As part of the ongoing rehabilitation program, a large hydrotherapy pool was constructed at the rear of the premises and the society was greatly assisted by the late Margaret Campion, a world renowned occupational therapist who specialised in pool therapy programs.

 

The name changed to Headwest in 1995 and since then has provided advocacy services for people with ABI, their families and carers. Addressing issues such as; accommodation, respite and carer support, recreation, education and training, legal assistance, medical and therapy services, transport and coordination and facilitation of self-advocacy for individuals. 

 

Headwest is guided by the belief that people with an ABI should be treated with dignity and respect, and be supported to achieve the greatest degree of independence possible in their participation in activities and opportunities available to the community of which they are a part.

 

Our philosophy is guided by our fundamental belief in human rights. People with disabilities often have to work with a large number of systems in their lives such as; social services, health services, public schools and private employers. We provide individual, systemic, peer and self advocacy services to support them in these activities.

 

Headwest provides advocacy, training and awareness on all issues relating to ABI